Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Deadly Combo Hits Top 70

March 25, 2016
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The duet album, Deadly Combo, from Indiana musicians, Matty Moe and Michael Barber, has hit the top 70 on Itunes reaching 61. A major accomplishments for an indie release with very little budget behind it.

Deadly Combo has gradually climbed the Itunes charts behind the single, Moon Rocks, co-produced between Michael Barber and Josh Tifer, and behind the song Indiana Boys.

The album was released via Barber’s ECP Music Group/Slam.House. An indie label that is now working with Universal Music Group.

The album does feature 3 major features, one from Streetlife of the Wu Tang Clan, and two features from Nappy Roots.

Purchased the album on Itunes or stream via Spotify and leave a comment telling us how you feel!

ITUNES LINK

 


Rap Beats? The Sample Saint Has You Covered

January 5, 2016
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Are you looking for industry quality production ? Listen to one of the best producers in the music industry, The Sample Saint. Listen below or head over to the production page, The Sample Saint on Soundclick.

 


ANGELS LIKE REBELS RECORD LABEL ENGAGES FANS IN TALENT DISCOVERY

November 5, 2015
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Angels Like Rebels, a record label that engages fans in talent discovery and promotion, launches its crowdfunding platform on November 5 at noon, ET.

Angels Like Rebels held auditions in New York (chaired by Grammy-winning producer Gordon Williams, best-known for his work with Lauryn Hill and Amy Winehouse), Los Angeles, Miami and Boston, and used referrals from recording studios, producers and vocal coaches to select its first group of artists from over 600 applicants.
The crowdfunding campaign will continue for 17 days. Artists who reach the funding target, set at $200,000, will have a 3-year deal with the label to record and release two albums. Fans receive various rewards in exchange for their contributions, including albums, concert tickets, and artist branded merchandize, not to mention bragging rights for launching the next generation of music stars. “The music industry is looking for a new business model. We offer a solution,” says Alexander Volgin, the label’s 20-year old founder.
“We turn fans into angels: we invite everyone who loves music to support talented artists and benefit from their success.”
Fans may also enroll to promote their favorite artists and share 20 percent of net royalties earned by these artists during the term of a record contract. Artists keep 70 percent of net profits, and they don’t have to repay the money contributed by their fans – unlike recording advances in a typical record label deal. Artists also maintain full creative control over their music. “There is wide support for our cause among artists and fans who are not satisfied with how the music industry treats people who create music,” added Volgin.
“We are rebels! Our goal is to empower artists.”


Afroman Arrested and He Knows Why

February 18, 2015
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Cops hauled Afroman off stage, and he knows why — because he punched a female fan in the face … instead of getting high — and the video of the incident is brutal.
The rapper was performing in Biloxi, Mississippi Tuesday night when the woman somehow got on stage and started dancing next to Afroman — and then suddenly, without warning … he turned and landed a right-handed haymaker to her face.
He obliterated the woman … who went down hard — but Afroman kept on performing. Witnesses say she was bleeding and crying, but somehow she managed to get up on her own.
Cops eventually stopped the show, escorted him off stage, and arrested him outside the venue. He was booked for assault.


Posted in music stuff, News

Slam House is More Than Just a Music Label

November 12, 2014
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Slam House is a movement started by Miami based publicist, Michael Bentley, and two Philadelphia entertainment heavyweights, Neal Foggie and Mike Authinik. Slam House Music announced earlier this year that they were looking for musicians and overall entertainers to sign to their company and they were also looking for musicians to tour with the Music Journal Series in early 2015. Slam House isn’t just a music label as they are now listed as Slam House Agency Group.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE


How Mitt Romney was Exposed for Buying Fake Social Media

May 5, 2014
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With Mitt Romney contemplating running for President again, publicist Michael Bentley revisits Romney’s social media failures during his first attempt at winning the White House.

With new reports surfacing that Mitt Romney, planning to run for President if Jeb Bush doesn’t, it kind of takes us down memory lane a mere 2 years ago when Mitt decided to go up against President Barack Obama and eventually lost to the incumbent President.

In the summer of 2012, the country was heavily involved in the presidential race between Obama and Romney. Mitt Romney was leading the polls in July,  as he was gaining more of Obama’s niche with the youngsters, and Obama’s campaign team appeared to be in trouble.

Romney and his team saw how President Obama won the 2008 election using a strategic plan to make sure they sealed not the popular vote, but the Electoral College. A good majority of this planning and campaigning from Obama’s team came from his social media and outreach to younger voters online.

Romney was winning the polls, but he was still behind in every aspect in terms of social media. Romney needed to boost his viral presence, and he contacted several companies to do so including publicist Michael Bentley.

Now it seems that the publicist took the money, added the followers, and then leaked the news to help Presidential Obama gain an advantage in the youth.

Bentley will speak with acclaimed journalist, Joe Klein next month on the process of the Romney scandal, and what other celebrities might have hired him to do the same.

 Source: http://theurbantwist.com/2014/05/04/mitt-romney-exposed-buying-fake-social-media/#comments


research finds no cognitive benefits to musical training

December 12, 2013
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hildren get plenty of benefits from music lessons. Learning to play instruments can fuel their creativity, and practicing can teach much-needed focus and discipline. And the payoff, whether in learning a new song or just mastering a chord, often boosts self-esteem.

But Harvard researchers now say that one oft-cited benefit — that studying music improves intelligence — is a myth.

Though it has been embraced by everyone from advocates for arts education to parents hoping to encourage their kids to stick with piano lessons, a pair of studies conducted by Samuel Mehr, a Harvard Graduate School of Education(HGSE) doctoral student working in the lab of Elizabeth Spelke, the Marshall L. Berkman Professor of Psychology, found that music training had no effect on the cognitive abilities of young children. The studies are described in a Dec. 11 paper published in the open-access journal PLoS One.

“More than 80 percent of American adults think that music improves children’s grades or intelligence,” Mehr said. “Even in the scientific community, there’s a general belief that music is important for these extrinsic reasons. But there is very little evidence supporting the idea that music classes enhance children’s cognitive development.”

The notion that music training can make someone smarter, Mehr said, can largely be traced to a single study published in Nature. In it, researchers identified what they called the “Mozart effect.” After listening to music, test subjects performed better on spatial tasks.

Though the study was later debunked, the notion that simply listening to music could make someone smarter became firmly embedded in the public imagination, and spurred a host of follow-up studies, including several that focused on the cognitive benefits of music lessons.

Though dozens of studies have explored whether and how music and cognitive skills might be connected, when Mehr and colleagues reviewed the literature they found only five studies that used randomized trials, the gold standard for determining causal effects of educational interventions on child development. Of the five, only one showed an unambiguously positive effect, and it was so small — just a 2.7 point increase in IQ after a year of music lessons — that it was barely enough to be statistically significant.

“The experimental work on this question is very much in its infancy, but the few published studies on the topic show little evidence for ‘music makes you smarter,’” Mehr said.

To explore the connection between music and cognition, Mehr and his colleagues recruited 29 parents and 4-year-old children from the Cambridge area. After initial vocabulary tests for the children and music aptitude tests for the parents, each was randomly assigned to one of two classes, one that had music training, or another that focused on visual arts.

“We wanted to test the effects of the type of music education that actually happens in the real world, and we wanted to study the effect in young children, so we implemented a parent-child music enrichment program with preschoolers,” Mehr said. “The goal is to encourage musical play between parents and children in a classroom environment, which gives parents a strong repertoire of musical activities they can continue to use at home with their kids.”


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